Posted on

starting cannabis seeds in rockwool

If you are on a personal connection, like at home, you can run an anti-virus scan on your device to make sure it is not infected with malware.

Completing the CAPTCHA proves you are a human and gives you temporary access to the web property.

What can I do to prevent this in the future?

Another way to prevent getting this page in the future is to use Privacy Pass. You may need to download version 2.0 now from the Chrome Web Store.

If you are at an office or shared network, you can ask the network administrator to run a scan across the network looking for misconfigured or infected devices.

Cloudflare Ray ID: 67446b147b420061 • Your IP : 185.230.143.81 • Performance & security by Cloudflare

Rockwool offers a long list of benefits to cannabis growers. Not only does it prevent pathogens from multiplying, but it helps seeds germinate and facilitates good drainage.

Rockwool also poses a potential health hazard to growers. New Rockwool cubes can contain a lot of loose fibres and dust. These particles can end up in the air, and even on your skin and in your eyes, mouth, and lungs. Much like asbestos, tiny fibres can build up in the lungs over time if you work with new Rockwool cubes every day.

Pros of Rockwool for Growing Cannabis

As you can see, Rockwool cubes offer growers plenty of benefits, from improved aeration to pathogen prevention. However, more environmentally concerned growers choose to avoid them because of how they’re made, and what they’re made of.

For one, Rockwool doesn’t contain any organic material. This means it’s immune to decomposition at the hands of mould and fungi. Rockwool is also free from heavy metals. These elements, such as lead and chromium, are highly toxic to plants, cause yellow leaves and prevent photosynthesis, and can even kill plants altogether.

Second, consider wrapping a rubber band or soft garden tie around the middle of the cube to ensure it doesn’t break in half during the next grow.

To accomplish this, use either Ph down chemicals, or lime juice (as it’s acidic). Add these to the water in small increments (VERY SMALL), and test the water to see where the Ph is. Continue doing this until you have a Ph of 5.5-6.

Most Rockwool cubes come with holes in them, if yours did not, than create a hole in one side that is approximately a quarter inch (0.75 cm) deep.

Important: Do not let the PH of the water go below 5. A Ph this low will damage the fibers of the Rockwool Cube

About 2-3 weeks after germinating, you are ready to transplant these babies into the hydroponic system of your choice. A good rule of thumb to go by is that you want to transplant them once the first roots begin poking out of the Rockwool cube. Don’t wait too long though, as eventually the roots will begin tangling around the cube since it is their only source of water. You want to catch them right as they pop out, so that when you transfer them into your hydro system the roots will grow down into the system, and not just try to feed off the Rockwool cube alone.

Items you will need:

Using either a PH test kit or a Ph meter, determine the Ph of the water. Water comes out pretty alkaline, usually around 7.4, so you will need to acidify it a little bit to bring that Ph down to the desired level. Aim for as close to a Ph of 5.5-6 as you can get.