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same seed different bag

A common practice in the seed industry is to sell the exact same variety of seed under different brand names. Labeling laws require seed companies to disclose the variety identity on the seed bag tag itself — which is different from the marketed brand name farmers are familiar with. However, it is extremely difficult for farmers to match which seeds are the same as others – a problem we call seed relabeling.

You might receive a level of service or convenience from one brand that you feel warrants a higher price. But it’s critical you know your full options so you can make the best agronomic and financial decisions when you buy seed.

Did you know the exact same seed can be sold under two names?

We recently released an online feature within FBN accounts to allow members to search the entire database for relabeled varieties!

The average cost difference between the two in the same state? $68 a bag!

As it turns out, it can be quite a bit. Members of Farmers Business Network are contributing their seed bag tags, seed price invoices, and yield data to an FBN Analytics project that helps farmers not be in the dark on seed relabeling.

Thirty-four states permit this for corn seed, while 30 permit it for soybean seed, according to data collected by the Association of American Seed Control Officials.

Still, it took some sleuthing for farmers to ferret out these kissin’ cousins of the seed world.

“The seed companies are evaluated (by farmers) on a very regular basis, so I really do take exception when people say that seed companies are not being honest or straightforward or transparent with their farmer customers,” LaVigne says.

What is the Farmers Business Network?

Prices aren’t the only factor that can differ between seed varieties sharing the same genetics. The Farmers Business Network (FBN) analysis found that when multiple brands sell the same variety, relative maturities differ 55% of the time.

FBN found prices between brands of the same seed variety may differ significantly.

Such a repository would include a record of which firm originated the variety and varietal characteristics.

In the seed industry, variety and brand definitions differ. A variety’s originator assigns the variety a name, but different brand names are used by the firm and by the companies to which it may license the variety. In many cases, both brand and variety name appear on the seed tag. In many company marketing efforts, though, only the brand name is discussed.

ecwis – 2/4/2015 15:01

ecwis – 2/4/2015 15:01

Buck S – 2/4/2015 18:24

For corn, the breeding group at Stine is pretty meager, so it is likely a bunch of germplasm is coming from the same place the traits are coming from.

Just had a seed salesman stop in .Told me a lot of stein corn is the same as channel.. R9313 is channel 197-31 was one example. Also Stein bean 19RA02 is the same as Asgrow1931 and Channel1900 and are quite a bit cheaper in a stein bag. Is there any validity to this. Not looking for opinions, just any factual data .. Looking for options as I haven’t purchased any seed yet. Thanks for any input .

Just had a seed salesman stop in .Told me a lot of stein corn is the same as channel.. R9313 is channel 197-31 was one example. Also Stein bean 19RA02 is the same as Asgrow1931 and Channel1900 and are quite a bit cheaper in a stein bag. Is there any validity to this. Not looking for opinions, just any factual data .. Looking for options as I haven’t purchased any seed yet. Thanks for any input .

What is the variety code on the Stine bag for R9313. 197-31 is 1036682 and is one of the most piss poor, biggest brittle snap piece of garbage that I have ever come across. You better get a five gallon pale of ky jelly if you are gonna plant that garbage cause your gonna take it in the shorts. Hopefully the Stine guys will stand behind it for you when you are vacuuming it off the field.