CBD Oil Recipes For Pain

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Turn your self-care routine up a notch by making one of these recipes that incorporates the cannabis compound CBD to improve sleep and reduce stress. Cannabis salves are very easy to make at home. All you need is some coconut and olive oil, beeswax pastilles, a few utensils and a little bit of weed

Turn Your Self-Care Routine Up a Notch with These CBD Recipes

The cannabis compound can be added to things like guacamole and chocolate to aid in pain relief, decrease anxiety, and help you get better sleep.

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CBD can be found in everything now, from mascara to lotions to cocktails. And it’s no wonder we’re adding the cannabis compound to everything—there’s increasing research that shows that CBD has many health benefits, such as pain relief, decreased anxiety and depression, and better sleep. CBD comes in a variety of forms, such as oils, food and beer, and body care products. The oil allows the most flexibility—you can drop some in your mouth before bed or create different recipes and infusions with it.

Because of increasing popularity and hundreds of products on the market, make sure you do your research and buy a high quality, reputable brand of CBD oil to use in these recipes.

This anti-inflammatory drink is a great way to relax before bedtime, especially with the added benefits of turmeric and ginger. The amount of oil you use in the recipe depends on your desired dose, so it’s better to start small and work your way up.

For a healthy snack that will also relieve some anxiety, make this guacamole. For a sweet and salty twist, try adding chopped mangoes. Serve with baked chips or fresh vegetables.

3. CBD Hemp Honey and Matcha Latte
Via Wake and Bake

CBD-infused honey is used in this recipe, but if you don’t have any, just mix together honey and your desired dose of CBD oil. To make the tea, all you have to do is blend the ingredients together in a blender or Nutribullet.

Having a crazy day? Have one of these as your afternoon snack for some natural stress relief. These little bites are vegan and made with a base of macadamia nuts and almond flour.

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5. CBD Peppermint Chocolate Cups
Via Fragrant Vanilla

For a healthy dessert, try these chocolate cups. Instead of using artificial dyes, these cups get their green color from spinach or matcha powder. Make a big batch and store it in the freezer to have on hand whenever you’re craving something sweet.

6. Berries and Chamomile CBD Cashew Cream
Via Mowellens

This simple cashew cream is made by blending chamomile tea and cashews until they form a cream. Once the cream is chilled, CBD oil and maple syrup are stirred in as the final touch. Serve the cream over berries or your favorite fruit.

Agar agar powder gives these gummies their gelatin-like texture. Instead of using a sweetener, carrot juice provides natural sweetness and gives the gummies their color.

Drizzle the next salad you make with this strawberry and CBD-infused salad dressing. If you’re not big on fruit-flavored dressings, feel free to leave the strawberry out and add some mustard or spices such as garlic and basil.

This gummy recipe uses tart cherry juice as the primary ingredient. Tart cherries contain melatonin, which is the hormone that helps regulate sleep. Use silicon molds to easily release the gummies when they’re done.

10. CBD Fresh Mint Tea
Via Mowellen

Another common form of CBD is in teas, which is what this recipe uses to make this refreshing drink. If you don’t have CBD tea available and just have the oil, combine regular mint tea with a couple of drops of the oil for the same effect.

Cannabis salve recipe

These days, cannabis lovers have a wide variety of options for consuming the plant. You can smoke joints, blunts, bowls, or dabs. If you don’t want to smoke, you can make edibles. And if you don’t want to get high at all, you can use cannabis topicals.

Within the category of cannabis topicals, salves are one of the most popular products. A salve is simply a combination of oils and melted beeswax and does not contain water. The beeswax provides the waxy consistency that people seek out in salves, and helps boost the shelf life.

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Making your own topical salves is something people have been doing for thousands of years and is fairly simple – especially if you’ve made edibles before.

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What are cannabis topicals?

Cannabis topicals includes a wide array of creams, salves, roll-ons, gels, and even personal lubricants that are made with cannabis and are meant to be applied directly to the skin.

When you smoke cannabis, the cannabinoids enter the bloodstream through your lungs, while edibles are absorbed inside the gut. Topicals work very differently.

Topical products can activate the endocannabinoid receptors in your skin, but they are not well absorbed through the skin so they’re most effective for localized treatment. If you’re looking for deeper relief, transdermal patches can penetrate the skin and enter the bloodstream. Transdermal products typically use some sort of additional ingredient that helps cannabinoids penetrate the skin that salves do not have.

Cannabis topicals occupy a small segment of the market (less than 1%, according to Headset) but within that, salves make up nearly 75% of topical sales, along with lotions, gels, and creams.

Other types of topicals include, but are not limited to:

  • Bath bombs, salts, soaks, and scrubs
  • Lip balm
  • Sprays
  • Massage oils or lubricants

Do cannabis topicals work — and can they get you high?

Cannabis salves and balms don’t enter the bloodstream, so they cannot get you high. In fact, that’s one of the reasons some people are more likely to try topicals — they want the therapeutic benefits of cannabis but don’t want to get high.

Cannabis topicals can provide some relief from skin conditions like psoriasis, eczema, and even joint pain like arthritis, due to the anti-inflammatory properties of cannabinoids like CBD and THC. The health benefits of CBD are well-known these days, and CBD topicals are far more common than those containing THC.
There is little data about the efficacy of cannabis topicals, and because cannabinoids are hydrophobic, they have trouble penetrating and being absorbed by the skin. Because many salves contain other natural ingredients or essential oils, some of the effects may not be entirely from cannabis. But while the data may be lacking, anecdotal evidence from cannabis consumers is rife.

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Tips and common mistakes with cannabis salves

  • Don’t smoke your cannabis salve. It won’t accomplish anything other than possibly hazardous throat and lung irritation.
  • Read the ingredients of store-bought salves. Don’t use anything that you may be allergic to, and make sure to only use the salve externally, especially if it contains potential irritants like menthol or eucalyptus.
  • Be patient. Consumers who have found success using cannabis topicals often describe it as part of a long-term, daily regimen. Don’t expect to see or feel results overnight, and try not to give up right away after you’ve come this far.

Do you need to decarboxylate weed to make a cannabis salve?

Yes. Even though you aren’t going to be smoking or eating the cannabis in your salve, you still want to decarboxylate it in order to “activate” the THC or CBD in the herb. The raw cannabis plant is abundant in acidic cannabinoids, not neutral ones. While acidic cannabinoids still have health benefits, there hasn’t been much research on using them topically just yet.

Decarboxylation simply requires heating up some cannabis in the oven for 30-40 minutes at around 220-245°F (105-120°C), making sure to check every five or 10 minutes to ensure the flowers aren’t scorched.

Alternately, because many salves call for using coconut oil as the base, if you have some cannabis-infused coconut oil on hand you can save yourself this step.

How to make a DIY cannabis salve

If you’ve checked out the CBD section at your local health store then you already know that topical cannabis products can be quite expensive. Luckily, making your own salve isn’t all that complicated — and can save you a lot of money.

This recipe from Homestead and Chill is about as easy as it gets. It makes about 2 cups of salve, but you can halve it or play around with the amounts if you’d like less (or more).

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