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autoflowers flowering

How does the pH dictate the yields, you ask? Well, when the pH falls below 5.5, plants cannot absorb certain nutrients like Calcium and Magnesium even if they are present at the roots. The same logic applies when the pH rises above 7. Suffice it to say that all the nutrients in the world cannot help the plant recover if the pH is not right. With an imbalance in the pH, the nutrients cannot be absorbed and the plants produce very little yields. Therefore, check the pH constantly to ensure that the plants are healthy.

4) Reduce nutrient strength

6) Light cycle

If you’re adamant on transplanting, though, make sure that the medium is exactly the same. For instance, if your seedling is growing in a potting mix of coco coir and compost, it should be transplanted to another container containing the exact same mix. Water the seedling container a few hours before transplanting to ensure that the soil is moist. There’s a high risk of hurting the roots when the soil is too dry or wet.

5) Keep an eye on the pH

Containers must be proportional to the size of the plant. For example, medium-sized plants require at least 5–7 gallon containers whereas big plants need pots that are more than 11 gallons. Remember, the type of container you choose plays a major role as well. Autoflowers love aerated soil that drains very well, so use breathable containers like fabric pots that allow maximum drainage.

Autoflowers growing outdoors usually receive only 12 hours of proper sunlight, and you’re probably wondering if that’s enough. However sunlight is the most powerful light compared to artificial systems set up by humans, so autos take advantage of the situation and produce maximum yields outdoors.

The pH value of your soil will determine how well your plants can access the nutrients within. If the pH becomes too high (alkaline) or too low (acidic), nutrient lockout will occur and deficiencies will set in. Cannabis plants thrive in a soil pH of between 6.0 and 6.5. Use a pH tester to track pH throughout your grow.

However, their yields aren’t as spectacular as those obtained from photoperiod giants, but, the trade-off for brevity makes the decision worthwhile for most growers.

8 weeks, with subsequent weekly harvests when growing fast strains.

A NOTE ON PH

Autoflowering strains typically move from seed to harvest in 8–10 weeks. However, some varieties can take up to 12 weeks to fully mature. Strains such as Bubble Kush Automatic and Quick One fall towards the faster end of the spectrum, whereas varieties like Royal Creamatic and Royal Haze Automatic take a few more weeks to ready their buds for harvest.

Because of this unique trait, outdoor growers can achieve multiple harvests during a single growing season. By germinating seeds week after week in early spring, you can theoretically rake in your first harvest after

Their impressive resistance to pathogens and pests allows them to withstand the challenges of outdoor growing.

Germination usually takes 1–3 days. During this time, your seeds will activate and send a root down into the soil and a shoot above the surface. To begin the germination process, you’ll need to prepare a suitable soil mix. Autoflowers don’t need as much nutrients as photoperiod varieties and prefer light and airy soil.

When your plants have completely matured and the stigmas have turned brown, your plant won’t take more than just a couple of days to be completely mature, at this stage you’re just waiting on the state of the trichomes to harvest your buds at the right time.

In the seventh week of flowering you will probably see an abundance of resin all over the buds and surrounding foliage, this is when you’ll definitely need a carbon filter or any other way to mask the strong cannabis aroma.

These long hairs emerge from the calyxes and are responsible for capturing pollen to produce seeds but usually, home growers don’t make seeds so these hairs won’t wilt and brown until the last couple of weeks of the flowering stage.

Week 9: Harvesting time

Remember that you don’t need to follow this table but it may be of help, by knowing exactly what effect each state of the trichomes provide you can fine-tune your harvest when your plants will provide the desired effect, so for example, you don’t want a super-strong head rush, you can harvest when 50/50 of the trichomes are amber and cloudy, resulting ina more balanced effect.

In the image below you can clearly see a bit of resin starting to form although it is not as abundant as when the buds are ready for harvest, this is a sign that your plant has just transitioned from the vegetative stage to the flowering stage and will gradually start to fatten up the buds and producing a lot of resin.

Stigmas can be found on the flowering sites and as the plant develops, starting from the pre-flowering stage and onwards, the entire plant will become filled with thousands of long white hairs.

Remember that trichomes produce and store the terpenes which are responsible for the smell, in most cases, when cannabis plants start producing trichomes they will start smelling really strong so depending on where you’re growing and the setup, now it’s a good time to deal with it.